MEGALITHIC MONUMENTS
OF IRELAND .COM
habitation in Ireland dates back to 7,000 BC, the hunter-gather period, which historians
refer to as the Mesolithic Age. Around 4,000 BC, this wandering lifestyle of Homo-sapiens
came to an end when farming was introduced into the culture by way of what would be later
known as Britain and Western Europe. It is during this period, from 4,000-2,300 BC the
Neolithic Age, that the majority of the Megalithic tombs that we still see today were built,
although some tombs continued to be built well into the Bronze Age beginning around 2,300
BC. Soon after, the construction of large monuments began to decline, but they continued to
erect standing stones well into the end of the Iron Age in 500 AD. Excavations of these
monuments have shown human remains were deposited after cremation. In addition, pottery
and stone tools were laid with burials. Researchers and archaeologists have also discovered
that ritual practices took place at various times of the year, with many of the monuments
carefully positioned by their builders to take into consideration the surrounding landscape as
well as the sunrise, sunset, lunar position and the location of rivers and springs deemed
sacred by the people of that time. Today, many of these outstanding monuments are still with
us, and it is a legacy we can be very proud of and a history and heritage we must continue to
treasure and preserve.
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Welcome to the website of Megalithic Monuments of Ireland.
This website is the result of our on-going love and passion for
Archaeology as well as our devotion to the wonderment of the
many Megalithic monuments throughout Ireland. We continue
to travel the country to bring you some fantastic photos of these
extraordinary monuments, which have stood proudly today as a
durable testament to their ingenious builders. The construction
and use of these monuments have long puzzled us, and even
though today we know much about their history and
construction, there are aspects that remain a mystery. But our
lack of a complete understanding of these edifices does not take
away from their beauty and majesty and, as such, we are
encouraged to think of these great monuments as stone pages in
the book of ancient history and human rituals and beliefs of our
ancestors on this island. Our earliest evidence of human
HOME PAGE
'PRESERVATION BY ILLUSTRATION'
                                                                                                                 www.eurolens.co.uk
The Irish American Museum of Washington, D.C.
KILNASAGGART INSCRIBED STONE, COUNTY ARMAGH
PUBLICATIONS
Books available from our
on-line E-Store
Here
ANTIQUITIES OF KILDARE
OF DRUIDS ALTARS AND GIANTS GRAVES
THE OGHAM STONES OF IRELAND
STONES OF TIME
THE DOLMENS OF SOUTH EAST IRELAND
CLOTHING-STORE
Clothing products available from
our on-line Cloths-Store
REENASCREENA SOUTH MULTI-STONE CIRCLE, COUNTY CROK
Available here @
MONUMENT OF THE
MONTH
APRIL 2015
ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS
FEATURED WEB-SITE
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PREHISTORIC
WATERFORD
-----------------------------

A  web-site focusing on the many
megalithic sites in the county of
Waterford, with photos, descriptions &
directions.

web addrtess:

www.prehistoricwaterford.com


RECONSIDERING BELDERRIG
& CÉIDE FIELDS
50 Years On

Prof. Seamus Caulfield ,
Member


Thursday 26th February 2015
@ 7.30 pm
Helen Roe Theatre
Society House
63 Merrion Square

www.rsai.ie
R.S.A.I. Lecture
Weather-Beaten Archaeology
Conference
IT Sligo, Sligo, Ireland
7th March
A one day event examining the impact
of the winter storms of 2013-14 on
archaeological sites in Ireland and the
UK. The Weather Beaten Archaeology
Conference is the first of its kind and
will establish a forum for the
exchange of experiences of extreme
weather events and their impact on
archaeological sites. Although
primarily concerned with experiences
from Ireland and Britain, the
conference will extend a warm
welcome to diverse experiences from
around the world.
http://weatherbeatenarchaeology.com/
Rathcroghan Conference
Archaeology Above
& Below
11th - 12th April 2015
The 2nd annual community
archaeology conference,
Archaeology Above & Below,
will be taking place on the 11th
to the 12th April this year, with
speakers and contributors
from far and wide to discuss all
aspects of community-driven
projects and remote sensing.


For more information and to book, go to

http://www.rathcroghanconference.com/
**** VIDEO ****
BRAND NEW
FEATURE
NEW TO OUR RANGE
To Commemorate the
1,000 Anniversary of the
** Battle of Clontarf **
BALLYHONEEN
WEDGE TOMB
COUNTY KERRY