MEGALITHIC MONUMENTS
        OF IRELAND.COM
BAUNOGENASRAID LINKARDSTOWN TOMB
BAUNOGENASRAID LINKARDSTOWEN BURIAL, COUNTY CARLOW
M M I
PHOTO by Pip POWELL
MAR 2010
This Linkardstown mound, marked only on the OSI map as 'Tumulus', is located in flat
level pasture, north of the Burren River, 'An Bhoirinn', south of the R725 and east of
Carlow town, 'Ceatharlach'. It was discovered during land clearance operations in the
early 1970's and subsquently excavated by Mr. Barry Raftery, U.C.D. in the autumn of
1972.  It originally consisted of a low circular mound, some 4m in maximum height
and 22m in diameter and had a kerb of low stones that covered a large centrally-placed
cist. The first phase of construction of this large tumulus, consisted of a polygonal cist
constructed on the ground surface and covered by a sod mound. Ten simple interments
were discovered in the upper levels of the mound (five cremations, five inhumations)
but apart from a single flint flake of plano-convex type no grave goods were uncovered
and it was concluded that the ten burials belong to the Early Bronze Age. Further
excavations discovered, under the earthen mound, a massive cist, covered by a heavy
capstone and centrally placed in a supporting cairn of stones. The polygonal cist was
built of five granite blocks which sloped inwards and a sixth stone, of limestone, which
had no part in supporting the capstone. This stone, the smallest of the six, seems to
have been selected for ease of movement to seal the 0.30m gap between the two
adjacent granite blocks. The cist was almost completely surrounded by a near-circular
platform of stones 0.30m in height at their edges, rising to 1.2m at the centre but they
did not cover the tomb. Inside the cist, the disarticulated, unburnt remains of an adult
male 'of exceptional size', were found with a finely decorated, round-bottomed bowl of
Linkardstown type, a worked, pointed piece of animal bone and a small perforated
object, probably a toggle, of jet or lignite. The Tumulus was later re-used in the Early
Bronze Age, in the early second millennium BC, as a cemetery and the mound was
enlarged to incorporate at least ten more simple burials.
CO-ORDINATES
52 48' 44.589"N...6 49' 25.732"W
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